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Friday, 22 August 2014

Where are the Greek ATM machines?

Greece is a country full of as many dilemmas as the myths it has lived on for years. Having been diagnosed the bad boy of the EU, in its haste to rehash its benign image as the bastion of civilization in Europe, it has recently been responsible for some very nasty and - quite frankly - unnecessary actions, which are so much against 'their own,' that they almost seem spiteful! This is particularly evident with their banks. We know that most bankers - when they have finally got their hands on your cash - think that it is theirs, but has it ever occurred to them that without clients and customers, thier coffers would be empty?



It occurred to me that the sudden disappearance of an ATM in my village - previously called a bank - that it was the result of some ominous banking crash and that some thoughtful competitor would come to the rescue and replace it with an even better service. But no, it was just the beginning of the end. Now, along with the entire inhabitants of my village, I have to make a weekly visit to my nearest big town to get access to my British pension, there being no other choice. This is because all the other provincial ATM's have now been switched off. Apart from a few little old ladies and retirees who bravely scramble onto a weekly bus, Greece is going back to being a cash economy. But what is the main reason behind it, other than the Greek governments orders from Germany? I think that the main reason is misinformation. I believe that it is not true that Greece is in the hands of accountants. It is my opinion that the Greek economy has actually been abducted by some unfeeling robots. Clearly a close relation to your average ATM machine, these robots are only programmed to save money, at the expence of the people they are supposed to serve.



In the light of this absence of compassion and humanity, perhaps the future will lie in the field of telephony - as it does in deepest darkest Africa and in the UK as well - whereby with an absent minded click of your mobile phone, your PayPal account conveniently pays for your Brussle Sprouts or your oversized chunks of Feta Cheese and, in no time at all. The question is, which bright spark is going to get there first - past the punishing and no doubt inhibiting Greek banking laws - in order to bring Greece once more into the 21st century.

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